So It Goes....
Liz // 22 // Student // Writer // The following is a compilation of images, ideas, and texts that inspire my writing projects--I may even include personal creations from time to time. // Currently reading: A Game of Thrones by George R R Martin.

thesunflower23:

Degas’ photographs of his ballerinas

theseluckystars:

My name is Zadie Smith, and I am a 38-year-old pathological reader. I would like to say in my defense that I don’t really get the appeal of YOLO. I live many times over. Hypothetical, subterranean lives that run beneath the relative tedium of my own and have the power to occasionally penetrate or even derail it. I find it hard to name the one book that was so damn delightful it changed my life. The truth is, they have all changed my life, every single one of them—even the ones I hated. Books are my version of ‘experiences.’”

What It Means to Be Addicted to Reading: Summer is a wonderful time for the bibliophile.

panic-at-the-discount-store:

I show affection for my pets by holding them against me and whispering I love you repeatedly as they struggle to escape from my arms

tardiscrash:

Let’s be real, in a time before the internet people didn’t have more adventures and make more meaningful connections. They watched TV and listened to CDs. Before that they listened to records and read magazines. Before that they listened to the radio and read bad dime novels. Before that they embroidered or some shit.

People have been staying inside and ignoring other people for as long as there have been buildings. 

The truth is, everyone likes to look down on someone. If your favorites are all avant-garde writers who throw in Sanskrit and German, you can look down on everyone. If your favorites are all Oprah Book Club books, you can at least look down on mystery readers. Mystery readers have sci-fi readers. Sci-fi can look down on fantasy. And yes, fantasy readers have their own snobbishness. I’ll bet this, though: in a hundred years, people will be writing a lot more dissertations on Harry Potter than on John Updike. Look, Charles Dickens wrote popular fiction. Shakespeare wrote popular fiction - until he wrote his sonnets, desperate to show the literati of his day that he was real artist. Edgar Allan Poe tied himself in knots because no one realized he was a genius. The core of the problem is how we want to define “literature”. The Latin root simply means “letters”. Those letters are either delivered - they connect with an audience - or they don’t. For some, that audience is a few thousand college professors and some critics. For others, its twenty million women desperate for romance in their lives. Those connections happen because the books successfully communicate something real about the human experience. Sure, there are trashy books that do really well, but that’s because there are trashy facets of humanity. What people value in their books - and thus what they count as literature - really tells you more about them than it does about the book.

Brent Weeks (via victoriousvocabulary)

BAM

(via yeahwriters)

vintageanchorbooks:

Literary Word Count Infographic: http://shortlist.com/entertainment/books/literary-word-count-infographic

Ten Amazing Literary Names For Future Bookish Babies | Quirk Books : Publishers & Seekers of All Things Awesome

Would you name your child after a literary character? (I probably would not go with “Scheherazade,” but that’s just me.)

ART HISTORY MEME || [3/3] countries/regions: Italy (architecture)

wander-to-the-stars-above:

I have too many books but also not enough books and I also have no space for books but I will make space for books